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Factors contributing to maize and bean yield gaps in Central America vary with site and agroecological conditions

Author: Eash, L.
Author: Fonte, S.J.
Author: Sonder, K.
Author: Honsdorf, N.
Author: Schmidt, A.
Author: Govaerts, B.
Author: Verhulst, N.
Year: 2019
ISSN: 0021-8596 (Print)
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10883/20231
Abstract: In Central America, population and food demands are rising rapidly, while yields of staple crops, maize and beans, remain low. To identify the main factors limiting production, field trials were established in six maize- and bean-producing regions in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, representing about three-quarters of the maize-producing area. Potential yield-limiting factors were evaluated in 2017 and included: water stress, nutrient deficiency, pest and disease pressure, and/or inter-plant competition. When considering all sites, improved fertilization and pest and disease control significantly improved yields in maize by 11 and 16%, respectively but did not have a significant effect in beans. Irrigation had no effect due to good rainfall distribution over the growing season. Optimized planting arrangement resulted in an average 18% increase in maize yield, making it the most promising factor evaluated. The treatment and site combinations that increased both crop productivity and net profit included management changes that improved resource use efficiency. However, the contribution of each limiting factor to yield gaps varied across sites and no treatment was effective at increasing yield consistently across sites. Production constraints are highly dependent on local management practices and agroecological location. Therefore, public and private development efforts that seek to increase production should conduct multi-year, participatory experiments to identify limitations pertinent to the area in question. The next step is then to evaluate sustainable and profitable practices, to address those limitations and provide sound recommendations to farmers while decreasing the environmental and economic costs.
Format: PDF
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Copyright: CIMMYT manages Intellectual Assets as International Public Goods. The user is free to download, print, store and share this work. In case you want to translate or create any other derivative work and share or distribute such translation/derivative work, please contact CIMMYT-Knowledge-Center@cgiar.org indicating the work you want to use and the kind of use you intend; CIMMYT will contact you with the suitable license for that purpose.
Type: Article
Place of Publication: United Kingdom
Pages: 300-317
Issue: 4
Volume: 157
DOI: 10.1017/S0021859619000571
Country of Focus: EL SALVADOR
Country of Focus: GUATEMALA
Country of Focus: HONDURAS
Agrovoc: INTERCROPPING
Agrovoc: AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION
Agrovoc: CONSTRAINTS
Journal: The Journal of Agricultural Science


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  • Socioeconomics
    Including topics such as farming systems, markets, impact & targeting, innovations, and GIS
  • Sustainable Intensification
    Sustainable intensification agriculture including topics on cropping systems, agronomy, soil, mechanization, precision agriculture, etc.

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